Monday, February 13, 2012

Out & About -Maryland Farms

It's not a trip to Lindsay, Ontario until you visit Maryland Farms. On Saturday afternoon we headed over to the Callaghan family farm (Maryland Farms) to meet with family friend Bill Callaghan for yet another tour of his family's operation. We arrived just in time for the afternoon milking which is the second of two daily milkings. As mentioned in another post just before Christmas last year, Maryland farms has one of the largest quotas to produce milk in Ontario. Being on the forefront of innovation when it comes to the milk production, The Callaghan family is always on the verge of something new, each time we visit. This time we were introduced to the newly built bio gas facility that converts a never ending supply of  manure into hydro electricity. It is a pretty technical and biological process that I couldn't begin to explain. To make this short, below is a look at the milking process and some of the newborn calves. 
The Milking Barn
Milking machines await a teat
On the left is the monitoring bracelet that each cow/heifer wears to identify each specific animal by number, how much milk they produce and other required data. On the right is the teat scrubber that cleans, sanitizes and dries the teat before they are hooked up to the milking machine.
A quick photo taken by Nicole of me cleaning the teats with the scrubber.
On the left is the milking machine sucking the milk via vacuum. On the right is a photo of a teat after an iodine bath has been applied. The application of iodine provides a barrier for bacterial growth on the teat after milking has ended.

Heading into the see the calves 
Disappointed that we had no milk
Keeping warm with wool
 Curious
Back into the barn
On the left is an automatic scratching brush that activates at the touch of a back or butt. On the right is one of the farm's top producers of milk. The top cow at the Callaghan farm produces over 60kgs of milk per day.

2 comments:

Chris Adamiak said...

Dude! That pic of the iodine covered udders looks like something out of this world! dairy farms rock!

Brian Marshall said...

Haha-I had to make sure to over exaggerate the iodine in the description so some hippie activist didn't think it was blood!