Saturday, September 15, 2012

Ruining Algonquin?


Photo by B. Marshall
By: The Eganville Leader
As the provincial government continues to look at logging in Algonquin Park, local foresters, mill operators and area residents are concerned logging may continue to be restricted in the park which will lead to a loss of jobs and the decimation of logging in the park.
  Several years ago, the province began to look at "Lightening the Ecological Footprint of Logging in Algonquin Provincial Park." While the County of Renfrew presented strong arguments on how this proposal would be devastating for logging in the area, it appears the province is moving ahead with reducing the areas available for harvest in the park as the issue was revisited this year. When the Endangered Species Act is added to the mix, it may just make timber harvest uneconomical for anyone dealing with Algonquin Park and in tum this will cause forestry business failures in the county.
  Added to the concerns of the county is the anticipated reduction of area available for harvest outside the park as a result of the ongoing Algonquin Land Claim and the Endangered Species Act. As well, potentials for forest biomass may be reduced if there is not enough wood supply in the county.
  An audit is being done right now into logging practices in Algonquin Park and municipal councils are examining the forms carefully as they consider possible implications of the audit.
  All this is at a time when the forest industry has already been decimated in our area. Major mills are operating at a reduced capacity and people have been laid off who have worked for logging operations for decades.
  So what is driving this reduction in logging in Algonquin Park? It is the desire to keep the park as pristine as possible for the folks who enjoy coming up for the weekend and enjoying a time in the wilderness and a chance to see moose. The sad thing is the park was originally set aside for logging and this is being lost in the overemphasis on ecotourism and the love of Mother Nature.
  However, if logging is discontinued in the park, and no one is talking clear-cut logging here because that is not the type of logging which is done to begin with, the forest will not benefit. Sustainable logging keeps the forest healthy and Algonquin Park healthy. It makes for a better environment for the flora and the fauna and a more beautiful park for all to enjoy.
  But, the folks in Toronto who are looking at the park have a vision of nature which is in no way realistic and in trying to save Algonquin Park they will in fact ruin it. In the meantime, they will also devastate businesses and families in Renfrew County who have relied on logging in the park. So no one wins, but it will take the decimation of logging in the park, a lack of wildlife and a raging forest fire to make anyone south of Renfrew County realize this.
  Meanwhile the jobs we have counted on will have been lost and our own economic landscape changed forever.
As the provincial government continues to look at logging in Algonquin Park, local foresters, mill operators and area residents are concerned logging may continue to be restricted in the park which will lead to a loss of jobs and the decimation of logging in the park.
  Several years ago, the province began to look at "Lightening the Ecological Footprint of Logging in Algonquin Provincial Park." While the County of Renfrew presented strong arguments on how this proposal would be devastating for logging in the area, it appears the province is moving ahead with reducing the areas available for harvest in the park as the issue was revisited this year. When the Endangered Species Act is added to the mix, it may just make timber harvest uneconomical for anyone dealing with Algonquin Park and in tum this will cause forestry business failures in the county.
  Added to the concerns of the county is the anticipated reduction of area available for harvest outside the park as a result of the ongoing Algonquin Land Claim and the Endangered Species Act. As well, potentials for forest biomass may be reduced if there is not enough wood supply in the county.
  An audit is being done right now into logging practices in Algonquin Park and municipal councils are examining the forms carefully as they consider possible implications of the audit.
  All this is at a time when the forest industry has already been decimated in our area. Major mills are operating at a reduced capacity and people have been laid off who have worked for logging operations for decades.
  So what is driving this reduction in logging in Algonquin Park? It is the desire to keep the park as pristine as possible for the folks who enjoy coming up for the weekend and enjoying a time in the wilderness and a chance to see moose. The sad thing is the park was originally set aside for logging and this is being lost in the overemphasis on ecotourism and the love of Mother Nature.
  However, if logging is discontinued in the park, and no one is talking clear-cut logging here because that is not the type of logging which is done to begin with, the forest will not benefit. Sustainable logging keeps the forest healthy and Algonquin Park healthy. It makes for a better environment for the flora and the fauna and a more beautiful park for all to enjoy.
  But, the folks in Toronto who are looking at the park have a vision of nature which is in no way realistic and in trying to save Algonquin Park they will in fact ruin it. In the meantime, they will also devastate businesses and families in Renfrew County who have relied on logging in the park. So no one wins, but it will take the decimation of logging in the park, a lack of wildlife and a raging forest fire to make anyone south of Renfrew County realize this.
  Meanwhile the jobs we have counted on will have been lost and our own economic landscape changed forever.

1 comment:

Chris Adamiak said...

Brother I agree, There is a very fine balance to achieve in Algonquin. I agree that a forest needs to be taken care of or it will suffocate itself. Think of Bonsai, the roots must be larger than the foliage for it to be healthy, and air must circulate. Good ol' Teddy Roosavelt had this quote back in 1912 that I think applies to this day, and will forever.

"There can be no greater issue than that of conservation in this country. Just as we must conserve our men, women and children, so we must conserve the resources of the land on which they live. We must conserve the soil so that our children shall have a land that is more and not less fertile than our fathers dwelt in. We must conserve the forests, not by disuse, but by use, making them more valuable at the same time that we use them. We must conserve the mines. Moreover, we must insure so far as possible the use of certain types of great natural resources for the benefit of the people as a whole"

I hope I make sense.